Book review: Hangman by Daniel Cole

Friday, March 30, 2018 Permalink

I read Daniel Cole’s debut novel Ragdoll about a year ago. I enjoyed it and liked the lead character, Detective William Falkes (Wolf). I remembered little about his offsider Detective Emily Baxter, which was unfortunate as this book – although labelled Falkes #2 – predominantly features Baxter and the former probationer we met in the first outing (Alex Edmunds) as well as a few new faces.

Continue Reading…

three-half-stars

Taking stock – March 2018

Thursday, March 29, 2018 Permalink

My blogging has been somewhat haphazard this year but these ‘taking stock’ posts allow me to blither briefly about all sorts of things without actually boring you to tears.

I’m a little surprised it’s the end of March. I agree with all of the memes out there suggesting that January went for years and the months since are just disappearing. 

Continue Reading…

Book review: The Paris Seamstress by Natasha Lester

Tuesday, March 27, 2018 Permalink

I enjoyed Natasha Lester’s second book, Her Mother’s Secret, but I’d really really loved her first book, A Kiss From Mr Fitzgerald. At the time I very much appreciated the insight it offered into the plight of women who’d come less than a century before me – not just through career-limitations but also through society’s beliefs and values, and sadly, its norms.

I reflected on this as I steamed through The Paris Seamstress. It’s most certainly saga-like. It doesn’t centre around topics as heavy and lesson-laden as Lester’s debut novel and yet I adored it and could not put it down.

I was rivetted. By the story of Estelle – a wannabe fashion designer in the 1940s – and her granddaughter Fabienne, a young woman wanting to make her own mark on the world.

Continue Reading…

four-half-stars

My perfect rock bottom

Thursday, March 22, 2018 Permalink

I’ve talked before about a few of my recurring dreams. There’s the one in which I miss my bus or train (its meaning I suspect is kinda obvious… missing THE boat – derr!). And two oldies – the clichéd disintegrating / falling out teeth; and the (slightly weirder) one involving huge contact lenses that won’t fit in my eyes.

Like I said… the meaning of some are probably pretty obvious while others a bit more obscure or metaphorical. And although I’m a lover of logic I actually believe it makes sense that we dream about stuff worrying us in our waking lives; things we may not even be conscious are plaguing us. 

Continue Reading…

Book review: Fool’s Gold by Fleur McDonald

Monday, March 19, 2018 Permalink

We take a step back in time – well a couple – in this latest novel by Australian author Fleur McDonald. We’ve met Detective Dave Burrows in her rural romantic suspense series (see my reviews of Suddenly One Summer and Sapphire Falls) and here we’re taken back to where it all began and he’s a newly appointed Detective and has moved with new wife, Melinda to rural WA, resplendent with dry heat, flies galore and brilliantly red soil.

The book also opens with a snippet from 1945 and a suicide that sets off a series of events for decades to come.

Continue Reading…

four-stars

Book review: Bring Me Back by BA Paris

Thursday, March 15, 2018 Permalink

Publishers usually don’t like bloggers or reviewers to review a book toooo long before its release – a rule I may be breaking here. The early version of Bring Me Back by BA Paris I received was published in early March. I think. However… other versions aren’t being released until mid 2018. So… I’m not actually sure if you’ll be able to get this one yet.

Continue Reading…

four-half-stars

Book review: The Family Next Door by Sally Hepworth

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 Permalink

2017’s The Mother’s Promise was my first Sally Hepworth novel. I suspect I was worried I wouldn’t enjoy her books – thinking they were too entrenched in motherhood and meaning (as a non-mother) I wouldn’t relate to them. Or – worse still – they’d remind me of opportunities lost and things I DID NOT HAVE.

I was surprised then, to enjoy the book as much as I did and happily launched into Hepworth’s latest – which includes a smidge of suspense – The Family Next Door.

Continue Reading…

four-stars

Book review: The Rúin by Dervla McTiernan

Saturday, March 10, 2018 Permalink

Dervla McTiernan was born in Ireland and lived there until 2011, before moving to Western Australia with her family. Her debut novel The Rúin is set in Ireland and its setting and dialogue quintessentially Irish, but there’s a snippet of her new country of abode, as one of the characters returns from a long stay in Australia.

Continue Reading…

three-half-stars

The problem with worth

Thursday, March 8, 2018 Permalink

I’ve talked before about issues I have with self-worth. And enough-ness. So much so that the idea of going into them AGAIN now seems like I’m rehashing ground I’ve dug up and reburied too many times to count.

But I read a lot about enough-ness nowadays. In terms of us feeling like we ‘are’ enough and ‘have’ enough. Or having too-much. Being ‘extra’ as the young folk possibly say.

Continue Reading…