• Book week for grown-ups

    Friday, August 23, 2019 Permalink

    Book-week is coming to a conclusion here in Australia. If I was less-lazy I’d google to see when, how and why it came about. To the best of my knowledge it wasn’t around when I was a kid.

    Nowadays however, my social media feeds are full of despairing parents trying to ensure their kids avoid years of psychosocial trauma lest their costumes not measure up.

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  • Book review: The Dirty Dozen by Lynda La Plante

    Monday, August 19, 2019 Permalink

    It wasn’t until after I read this book (that) it occurred to me we can’t be that far from the Jane Tennison we eventually meet in the Prime Suspect series. Though I guess a decade is a lifetime in Jane’s world.

    In the last book in this series Murder Mile, I commented that there seemed to be less sexist crap (misogynist bullshit I think I said) than in previous novels, but sadly her entry into the all-male Flying Squad, sees Jane yet again struggling with prejudice despite ‘integration’ seven years earlier.

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    four-stars
  • Book review: The Memories We Hide by Jodi Gibson

    Sunday, August 18, 2019 Permalink

    I’ve (virtually) known author Jodi Gibson for a number of years via the online writing and blogging world so was very excited she decided to independently publish her debut novel, The Memories We Hide.┬áIt’s an enjoyable read which reflects her warm and relatable writing style as well as her familiarity with small town Australia and country life.

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    three-half-stars
  • Book review: Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson

    Friday, August 16, 2019 Permalink

    I’ve actually never played Never Have I Ever, but this book by Joshilyn Jackson leverages off an adult version of the game… unexpectedly played by a group of inebriated women – who (I felt) interestingly see themselves as wives and mothers, rather than independent beings. And yes, that’s a bit judge-y but all definitions of the ‘book club’ early on suggest it’s the club of mothers with young children. There’s a SEPARATE group for the mothers of teens. (Of course that is completely irrelevant, but just kinda weird for this middle-aged singleton.)

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    three-half-stars
  • Book review: The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

    Saturday, August 10, 2019 Permalink

    I had planned to only read a little of this book one evening. I should know myself better as it’s rare that I can put a book down once I start, but The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell offered a really strong sense of menace. Or doom. Or maybe just suspense…. so I had to keep reading.

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    four-stars
  • Book review: The Perfect Wife by JP Delaney

    Thursday, August 8, 2019 Permalink

    Anthony Capella, writing as JP Delaney is garnering quite the reputation for offering readers twisty psychological thrillers. The first I read, The Girl Before was incredibly clever (and very popular) and – surprisingly – I enjoyed his second book, Believe Me even more.

    Now I’ve read the third, an obvious theme around fantasy, infatuation and perfection is emerging. And again, in The Perfect Wife, he’s creatively pushing boundaries and giving us something quite new.

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    four-half-stars
  • Book review: Where The Dead Go by Sarah Bailey

    Monday, August 5, 2019 Permalink

    I’ve really been enjoying Sarah Bailey’s crime fiction series featuring Gemma Woodstock. The first novel, The Dark Lake was set in Gemma’s rural hometown of Smithson. The second (which I enjoyed more), Into The Night leapt forward a few years and was set in Melbourne.

    And in this latest novel Gemma is on leave when she takes a case in Fairhaven, near Byron Bay. It’s another small Australian town but one characterised by beaches, tourists and caravan parks – offering up a quintessential Aussie coastal town, that’s a little different.

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    four-stars
  • Book review: Lady in the Lake by Laura Lippman

    Sunday, August 4, 2019 Permalink

    I’ve long been a fan of Laura Lippman: her standalone novels as well as her (reporter-turned-PI) Tess Monaghan series.

    In my review of Sunburn I note that Lippman is vague about the timing of plot elements so is able to keep we readers guessing. And here, in her latest standalone, she adopts the interesting approach of introducing a lot – like lots and lots – of narrators…. some of whom we meet but briefly. It could be confusing, but it actually works well. And is kinda clever.

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    four-stars