• Book review: Night Moves by Jonathan Kellerman

    Sunday, February 18, 2018 Permalink

    I was an Alex Delaware / Milo Sturgis devotee until several years ago when I commented that the series seemed to have meandered off into something I struggled to read. I’m not sure I articulated the why exactly… but I know I got tired of the crap between Alex and his boring long-term girlfriend Robyn and the big deal made out of the fact that big beefy Milo was (inexplicably / unexpectedly) gay and learned, and not well accepted by his police colleagues. In short… it felt like the same story was being repeated again and again and I stopped caring.

    Obviously Jonathan Kellerman heeded my advice (!!!!) cos the last few novels are back on track. Robyn is merely background noise and the focus is again more on the cases at hand than the other crap in the lead characters’ lives. (Which is interesting cos in other series I don’t mind the added personal flavour.)

    Continue Reading…

    three-half-stars
  • Book review: The Wife by Alafair Burke

    Saturday, February 17, 2018 Permalink

    I’ve talked before about how much I love prosecutor novelist Alafair Burke. I read her collaborations with Mary Higgins Clark but much prefer her solo work, including her series featuring Ellie Hatcher and most recently, The Ex, published last year.

    Her latest, The Wife, is another standalone. It was just out in the US when I received it for review (as I’d seen Alafair promoting it) but when I started reading was worried I’d somehow (inexplicably) read it before.

    I realised however, it was because the notion of a adulterous husband, wronged women, the downtrodden (or at least, unaware) wife and the he said/she said scenario has been a popular theme in my recent reads. (Anatomy of a Scandal, The Confession and The Wife Between Us come to mind.)

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    four-stars
  • Book review: London Rules by Mick Herron

    Friday, February 16, 2018 Permalink

    You may think I’ve been remiss in my book reviewing of late, however I’ve got you all fooled. Or something.

    London Rules by Mick Herron arrived several weeks ago. It’s the fifth book in the series known as (either) the Slough House or Jackson Lamb series… featuring the MI5 outcasts (the slow horses).

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    four-stars
  • Book review: The Cactus by Sarah Haywood

    Sunday, February 4, 2018 Permalink

    My favourite book of 2017 was the fabulously clever, quirky and addictive Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman. In fact many of my favourite books feature eccentric characters – sympathetically created and directed, and beautifully written.

    The Cactus by Sarah Haywood came as a complete surprise as I’d heard nothing about it but found the lead character, Susan Green almost as prickly-ly loveable as Eleanor. In that – god they’re annoying but endearing – kind of way!

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    four-half-stars
  • Book review: She’s Not There by Joy Fielding

    Saturday, January 27, 2018 Permalink

    I’ve read almost all of Joy Fielding’s books, though Goodreads tells me I’ve read only two (so most must have been read before I started tracking them there as I once owned far more than that). I came across her book See Jane Run back in the early 1990s and devoured everything she wrote and had written for the next decade (or two).

    I requested this book without knowing it wasn’t a new release and it was apparently published in 2016 though completely slipped through my reading radar / net thingy. And it was the perfect way to start the long weekend in Australia. 

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    three-half-stars
  • Book review: Shadow Man by Alan Drew

    Friday, January 26, 2018 Permalink

    I’ve commented before on the number of books set in the not-too-distant past. Obviously for some – like Bloody January which I read recently, Adrian McKinty’s Sean Duffy series and Lynda LaPlante’s young Jane Tennison books – the time is almost another character in itself – the setting pivotal to the plot; but others just remind us of when things were different. A couple of my favourite series, the Robert B Parker Spenser series; and (the late) Sue Grafton’s alphabet series area (were, in the case of the latter) set just a couple few several decades ago. (Seems like yesterday but time flies, I mean… weren’t we worried about the Y2K bug just a couple of years ago?!)

    Anyhoo, it’s a time before technology (as we now know it) was rife, before we had facts and information at our fingertips and, in some ways (given what we’re often exposed to), the opportunity for innocence was lost. 

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    three-half-stars
  • Book review: Redemption Point by Candice Fox

    Thursday, January 25, 2018 Permalink

    It’s no secret that I am a huge fan of Aussie author Candice Fox. I love her work and very much appreciate her dry and whip-smart wit.

    Two of my favourite (11) books of the year last year were hers and I was particularly excited by the appearance of Crimson Lake – the first in a new series after the popular Eden, Hades and Fall series.

    Redemption Point is the second book set in the fictional far north Queensland community of Crimson Lake. And again Fox not only offers up some amazing characters, but also firmly plants readers in the humid dense rainforest and the murky crocodile-infested waters of my home-state’s isolated and often unwelcoming far north.

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    four-half-stars