Book review: The Lying Room by Nicci French

Saturday, September 28, 2019 Permalink

I was surprised to read this was the first Nicci French (Nicci Gerrard / Sean French) standalone novel in 10 years. I’ve got quite a few on my bookshelves so it made me feel a little old. Of course I’ve not really been smitten with the Frieda Klein series, though have enjoyed the last few more than the first couple.

And I really enjoyed much of this novel and (unsurprisingly, cos I’m not great at delaying instant gratification) read it in a sitting. I was a tad disappointed with the end as it felt a little anti-climatic but I’d enjoyed everything that came before.

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four-stars

Book review: Under the Midnight Sky by Anna Romer

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Permalink

Although I missed Anna Romer’s much-lauded debut, Thornwood House I’ve read Lyrebird Hill and read and interviewed Romer about Beyond the Orchard.

I’d assumed this book would have gothic or fairytale (are they not the same thing? Different sides of the same coin perhaps?) undertones, but it sits a little more firmly in the mystery genre and what WAS to be a short pre-dinner read, turned into several hours, until I’d finished the book.

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four-stars

Book review: The Lost Girls by Jennifer Spence

Sunday, February 3, 2019 Permalink

I’d misunderstood the backcover blurb of this book by Jennifer Spence so thought it was going to predominantly be historical fiction, flashing back and forth in time to a point at which someone made a decision they later regretted or that could have gone two ways.

I’m not a fan of historical fiction. I had visions of war-time London or similar and was worried this book might be heavy-going.

And… Was. I. Wrong!!!! (That’s a statement, not a question by the way!)

Of course it helps that a time-slip of 20 years – which is the case in this novel – only takes us back from its present (the book kicks off in 2017) to 1997, which kinda feels like just yesterday. 

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four-half-stars

Book review: Ruin Beach by Kate Rhodes

Friday, January 11, 2019 Permalink

For the third or fourth time in just a couple of weeks I find myself coming upon a series part-way through. But thankfully – once again – it was certainly not a problem. And I enjoyed this a lot, so have already added this book’s predecessor (cos there is only one) to my ‘must borrow or buy’ list.

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four-stars

Book review: The Truth and Triumphs of Grace Atherton by Anstey Harris

Saturday, January 5, 2019 Permalink

The publicity surrounding The Truth and Triumphs of Grace Atherton suggests it would be popular with fans of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, by Gail Honeyman – my favourite book of 2017, so I happily moved away from my crime fiction and thrillers to dip my toes into the quirky world of Grace Atherton.

It has to be said however, that Grace and Eleanor have little in common. And that’s not a bad thing. Anstey Harris’s Grace is very different to the prickly Eleanor (who readers couldn’t help but love) however this grabbed me from the first sentence…

We were staying at David’s apartment in Paris the night the woman fell onto the Metro tracks.

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four-half-stars

Books for Christmas

Sunday, December 2, 2018 Permalink

I don’t tend to give books as gifts but that’s only because I worry the recipient will think it’s one I got for free! However… they’re ideal presents and this time of year non-fiction books (including memoirs, cookbooks, self-help books) are out in force because they are – indeed – excellent gift ideas!

I’m not hugely into non-fiction. My eyes glaze over at the idea of someone’s memoir – no matter how interesting their life might be, or how inspiring they are. But two hardcover books have arrived (at casa Debbish) recently that I think would make excellent gifts.

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Book review: Holy Ghost by John Sandford

Monday, October 29, 2018 Permalink

I was a tad harsh on John Sandford and Virgil Flowers when we last caught up in Deep Freeze. In reality I missed the wild, irresponsible and irreverent Virgil who seemed much changed. Though in fairness to him he was facing fatherhood and monogamy for the first time ever.

Obviously it didn’t deter me as I was keen to rejoin Virgil (or ‘that fuckin Flowers’ as he’s known to most) on his latest exploits. And (other than the weird inclusion of bloody larceny involving children’s toys again – this time lego* instead of barbie dolls!) THIS was more the Sandford I know and love.

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three-half-stars