Book review: Kill the Father by Sandrone Dazieri

Wednesday, January 11, 2017 Permalink

It’s weird when a book becomes something you’re not expecting. I recently read a book that ventured into the mystical… and I wasn’t quite ready for it. This book by Sandrone Dazieri – the first UK release for the author of 8 novels and 50 screenplays – was good. Indeed, I demolished the first half in a sitting. But – it became something kinda different as Dazieri introduced elements that, well… while they may have made sense to many, were less of interest to me.

four-stars

Book review: The Girl from Venice by Martin Cruz Smith

Saturday, October 29, 2016 Permalink

As I’m not a fan of historical fiction I wasn’t quite sure how long I would last with this latest release by Martin Cruz Smith. And – although it wasn’t a riveting read – I found myself quite enchanted by the story of the Italian fisherman Cenzo, and Giulia… the girl he found in the lagoon.

three-half-stars

Book review: Hidden Killers by Lynda LaPlante

Friday, October 28, 2016 Permalink

One of my top six books last year was Tennison by Lynda LaPlante. As a fan of the (ahem) older Jane Tennison via LaPlante’s Prime Suspect series I loved that she’d leapt back in time, allowing us to meet a young Jane and giving us the opportunity to understand how the popular character of the 1990s became so resilient… not to mention a bit of a hard-arse.

Happily LaPlante is now offering up another episode in the life of young Jane – with her passion for justice and occasional disdain for authority – as she continues to doggedly pursue the baddies.

four-half-stars

Book review: Leave Me by Gayle Forman

Sunday, September 18, 2016 Permalink

I’ve only read one previous book by the popular young adult novelist Gayle Forman and was surprised at how much I enjoyed I Was Here. In my review I mention that it touches on a lot of important themes. (As does the book-turned-movie, If I Stay, which I’ve seen but not read.)

Forman’s latest is her first book for ‘adults’ – to use the publisher’s vernacular – and its theme is certainly targetted at an audience conscious of commitments and responsibilities. Like many of her young adult novels, the notion or threat of death lies at the centre of this novel though it’s probably a little less weighty (theme-wise) than many of her previous books.

four-stars

Book review: It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover

Wednesday, August 10, 2016 Permalink

In the lead up to its release, I saw It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover EVERYWHERE. Hoover’s an adept and enthusiastic user of social media (a trait I love) so helped build the anticipation and excitement and – although I’d never read anything from the American author – I knew she had a bevy of YA and romance-loving fans who helped animate the groundswell.

This latest book is – again – a romance but despite my antipathy toward the genre I started to suffer from FOMO when I saw the books appearing everywhere, so was very glad when mine appeared (and remembered I’d requested a review copy from the Australian publisher).

four-half-stars