Book review: The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh

Saturday, July 24, 2021 Permalink

I’ve only read a couple of Steve Cavanagh’s Eddie Flynn novels in the past and always reflect on how I miss the golden days of the legal procedural.

Cavanagh manages to easily traverse the balance between the mystery / crime solving element and showcasing the (both) boring and enterprising foibles of the justice system. He’s also created very likeable characters in the ensemble cast supporting Eddie and – in some ways – I find myself drawn as much to them as I do to the former con-man turned-lawyer.

four-stars

Book review: The Night She Disappeared by Lisa Jewell

Tuesday, July 20, 2021 Permalink

Many of the books I read unfold in dual timelines. Quite often decades apart. The Night She Disappeared by Lisa Jewell offers three separate narratives, though only a year apart. It means secrets and lies haven’t had time to fester, but it means wounds are still fresh and grief is still palpable. Of course it may also mean the story is not yet over.

four-half-stars

Old skool blogging

Sunday, July 18, 2021 Permalink

A few of us have recently been talking wistfully about old school blogging. We’ve discussed the fact that many of those we once followed a decade or more ago have disappeared. It’s a weird feeling. One minute we know everything about their lives and next thing….poof.

Book review: The Whispers by Heidi Perks

Sunday, July 18, 2021 Permalink

The Whispers by Heidi Perks is an intriguing read. It’s one of those books featuring a narrator who may – or may not – be reliable. On one hand they appear entirely normal and only worried about a missing friend, but on the other their behaviour seems excessive. Bordering on obsessive and increasingly worrying.

But then it seems that others are keeping secrets so we’re not entirely sure who to trust.

three-half-stars

Book review: The Ocean in Winter by Elizabeth de Veer

Friday, July 16, 2021 Permalink

I wasn’t sure what to expect from The Ocean in Winter by Elizabeth de Veer. I’d requested it from an online review platform thinking perhaps it was a mystery or thriller (ie. my reading bread & butter). It’s not, but that was fine.

de Veer cleverly plots this out in almost a circular way. We start near the end before moving back in time. The book unfolds from three sisters’ points of view. The opening scene tells us a little of the history before we reach those events, but holds back on details to sustain the intrigue.

four-stars

Book review: False Witness by Karin Slaughter

Sunday, July 11, 2021 Permalink

False Witness by Karin Slaughter is the latest in a series of fabulous thrillers I’ve read within a short space of time. I’ve long been a fan of Slaughter’s series but am also very much enjoying her standalone novels.

I was worried this book might be a bit predictable, from the blurb. The premise seems kinda obvious, as if there will be nowhere for it to go that we haven’t been before. But – not only does  Slaughter kick-off with an interesting twist – she manages to eke out the past and present in such a way that kept me riveted.

four-half-stars

Book review: Catch Us The Foxes by Nicola West

Friday, July 9, 2021 Permalink

Oft-referenced advice to wannabe authors is to ‘write what you know’ and Australian author Nicola West has most certainly done that in her debut novel, Catch Us The Foxes.

This is a book within a book. Kind-of. There’s a brief introduction in the present before we’re introduced to The Showgirl’s Secret, a true crime book written by (former) journalist intern Marlowe Robertson. ‘Lo’ is the daughter of the town’s head of police who feels stuck in her small hometown and literally stumbles across the body of a friend. In real life, West grew up in Kiama – the book’s setting – as the daughter of a police officer and is a journalist herself.

three-half-stars

Here comes the sun

Monday, July 5, 2021 Permalink

I’ve been a misery guts for a while. Although, having said that, this could (in fact) be who I am now as I think it’s gone on for a few years… but I mean (even) more (so) of late.

I injured my back over two months ago and it wasn’t until this past week that I could get out of bed without levering myself in some weird slingshot type way lest I keel over in pain.

And then, I got an ear infection. Given I recently had my first cold sore in years I’d say it’s a reminder that my immune system is a tad fucked.

Book review: The Others by Mark Brandi

Sunday, July 4, 2021 Permalink

If I understood the genesis of the term waxing lyrical (and wasn’t too lazy to google it) I would say I would be doing just that about The Others by Mark Brandi. Because I adored this book.

Brandi’s given us an amazing narrator in 11 year old Jacob and I do have a penchant for books written from a child’s point-of-view. It has to be done well though because their voice can very easily seem off. It can hard to capture innocence and naiveté of the young, when some – like Jacob – have good cause not to be.

five-stars